Search

Hoten Holler!

Category

Bees

October Snow

12 October 2019 – sunny and 26 with snow on the ground

We had the typical 10th of October snow storm.

IMG_9998
View from the deck on Thursday morning

It was quite a drastic change in temperatures as the high on Tuesday was in the 70s and then it snowed and dropped to 14 degrees Wednesday night.  The Sheriff seemed to be the only one that was really happy about the snow.

IMG_E0002
Sheriff Joe Loves the Snow!

It isn’t all that bad, though.  We were able to get some bales of hay out for the cows and as we had been expecting the weather to change, we wrapped the beehive in tar paper.  Because of the rapid change in temps, we decided to bring Maverick, the cat, in from the barn for the night.  I brought him into the mudroom a few nights last winter that were bitterly cold and he meowed the whole time.  This time, however, he was super quiet and slept the whole night.  He did seem ready to get back to the barn the next day.

Speaking of animals, Maverick has been taunting the Sheriff quite a bit.

IMG_9958
Want to come down and play?

It all came to a big head when Sheriff Joe decided to go after the dang cat and while sprinting across some rocks, Joe tore out his toenail.  He didn’t stop, however, until Maverick was stuck up a tree. I think Maverick was singing that Bob Marley tune while he hid out in the tree,  “I Shot the Sheriff!”.   Hoten Holler drama.  Anyway, Joe has been pouting ever since because his toe hurts and maybe his ego too?

Dave and I enjoyed the warm weather earlier in the week with a visit from my Mom and Dad.  We put them to work and split some wood with the new splitter.

IMG_9980
Ranch Transportation
IMG_9997
The whole family splitting wood

We got to have some fun, too. Dave went to help a neighbor with his cattle round up, and Mom, Dad, and I got a front row seat from the truck.  It is really neat to see the real cowboy stuff that happens in this country.

IMG_9994
Neighbors round-up on horses and using ATVs and Trucks

We were also happy the elk returned for a visit both nights they were here.  They had left for about a week and we thought they were gone for the season, but they decided to come back so Mom and Dad could watch and hear them.

It was so great to see my folks, but they left (fled) just ahead of the snow storm.  Today is supposed to get into the upper 40s but the wind is howling and it is pretty miserable working conditions outside.  We are supposed to climb back into the 50s next week which will be nice, and hopefully the right conditions for taking calves to market.

IMG_9893
Shiner is #4 with the white face.  All the calves are getting big!

 

We have decided to keep the four heifers, Andie, Cupid, Fatz and Lucky.  The steer, Shiner, will be going with a neighbor’s calves.  We loved this little guy, if you remember he was the really listless one that we didn’t think was going to make it. It turns out he is just lazy, and has turned out to be really big and healthy.  Still, we aren’t in the business of keeping pet steers, so off he goes.

The following week we will be sending some of the older girls to the auction.  Also, Boohaa, one of our original cows  is going. She has been exposed to a bull for a full year and hasn’t gotten pregnant. She is a real sweet girl, but again, that’s not part of the business plan. This isn’t the fun part of raising cows, but it has to be done and we tell ourselves that they all had a good life here on the Holler where they were spoiled with beautiful green fields, shelter from the snow, and lots and lots of cake and head scratches.  Also, if we were made of hay I’m sure they would have no problem eating us or sending us to auction.

IMG_9830
Marzee and Shiner in the background

Well, that’s it for this week.  Stay warm out there and we’ll try to do the same!

 

Fall Harvest

19 September 2019 – sunny and 75

Autumn harvest season has arrived.  We have been busy on the Holler putting things up.  First we put up the hay.

IMG_9859
A barn full of square bales.  It’s the cow’s version of the Golden Corral.

Then we had about a million cucumbers so we put up pickles.

IMG_9734
One of many batches of pickles in process

The bees really went to town this summer and we have been spending several days harvesting and putting up honey.

IMG_9793
South Dakota Liquid Gold

Now, it is starting to get a little cold in the evenings, but the tomatoes are coming in like crazy.  Every day for the last week I have picked about 15 tomatoes, and it looks like there will be at least 3-4 more days of picking that many.

Dave and I made salsa.

IMG_9803
Super Fresh Salsa

We canned and put up more tomatoes. After finally getting the tomatoes canned I found the most amazing thing on the counter in the spot where they had all been sitting.  Counter space!  I hardly recognized my own kitchen.

IMG_9850
Endless tomatoes

Nothing tastes better than a late summer tomato.  We have been eating so many tomato sandwiches it’s kind of getting old.

IMG_9816
A change up to the mater sandwich….Caprese salad and a glass of Franzia!

Dave has given me a new nick-name:  The Mater Queen of So. Dak.  I think this enormous tomato would have won a prize at the state fair, so I’ll embrace the new title.

IMG_9865
That tomato is almost as big as that cow!

We have done so much canning this year that we decided if we get snowed in this winter we will probably not bother plowing out.  Instead we will stay in and eat pickles, tomatoes and honey.

IMG_9854
We’re starting our own grocery store.

We have also been gathering firewood.  Here is the pile that we will split and stack that we hope will keep us warm for a few nights…ha ha.

IMG_9844
Trailer full of wood
IMG_9861
This looks like a cool fall day project

Another fall task has been putting up the haying equipment for the winter.  Dave and I spent quite a bit of time reorganizing the barn lot and Dave did a lot of greasing and maintaining on the mower, baler, rake etc.  We think the barnyard cleaned up pretty nice.

IMG_9871
All the equipment in a neat little row

And finally, we have been entertained mornings and evenings with tons of elk.  In past years, we have heard and seen a few herds, especially in the fall rut.  This year, the elk have decided that our south pasture is the best new nightclub in South Dakota.  Nearly every evening, right around sundown, the bugling begins.  In the low light, you can only make out the giant forms of the herd in the distance, but you can hear them bugle and snort.  It continues late into the wee hours of the morning and tapers off around 3AM.  Then, right before sunup, the bugling begins again and we get a good look at the herd.

IMG_9819
Evenings at the South Pasture Nightclub
IMG_9820
Elk

We also get a good look at whatever damage they have done to our trees.

I wonder who was responsible for the death of these trees?

IMG_E9857
Game-cam images
IMG_E9858
He’s a big bull, and it looks like he’s been fighting because one of his antlers is broken.

This morning, there were about 25 cows and at least one big bull shutting down the south pasture night club.  They decided to head east and jump the barbed wire fence.  As they ran it sounded like a herd of horses running, except the rhythm of their hoof-falls was a little different than horses. How can I explain this in writing?  I’ll try by explaining that running horses sound like the beat of the William Tell Overture or the Lone Ranger theme song.

“Da da DAA da da DAA da da DAA dum dum”

The elk sound more like a car on a bumpy road.

“Ducca ducca ducca ducca ducca ducca…..”

Okay, if you read that out loud you may  get the idea.  I wouldn’t recommend reading it out loud if you’re at work or somewhere in public.  You might get some strange looks. Back to this morning, we saw the elk start running east and heard their trampling feet:

Ducca ducca ducca ducca ducca…..

One by one they began to jump the barbed wire fence and then we heard:

Ducca ducca ducca ducca TWANG!!!!!

Dave and I looked at each other over our coffee cups and he said, “I guess we’ll be fixing fence today.”  Never a dull moment out here on the Holler

That’s about it for this time.  We are working outside today, enjoying the unusually warm autumn weather. We are hoping for a long, mild autumn, but in reality we could be less than 1 week from the first snow flying.  We better get out there and split that firewood!

IMG_9806
How is your September?  Hmmmmm?

 

Squirrels and Turkey and Elk – Oh My!

30 August 2019 – raining and 47 degrees

Yep, it’s raining again so I am taking advantage of the weather and blogging this morning.  We have mostly caught up on haying.  We spent yesterday finishing a couple areas that are difficult to maneuver the tractor in and trying a second cutting in some lush areas in the south pasture.

IMG_9740
Mowing the stock dam

Overall, we had a stellar haying season, putting up well over 1500 bales.  When it stops raining and we bale the stock dam and the second cutting we will be DONE and Dave and I have vowed that we will do something to celebrate.  We will probably just go to the local bar in Pringle (The Hitch Rail) and have a burger and a beer, but it will be a celebratory supper nonetheless.

IMG_9718
Mowing in the clover
IMG_7291
Lots of bales

We were fortunate to have some help for a week this month.  Dave’s good friend from the Coast Guard, Mike, came to visit and “experience” ranch life.  He got to check and water cows, put fence posts in the ground, jackhammer some rocks, drive the tractor, cut and haul slash, and of course he got to rake, bale, and load hay into the barn.

Mike said it was so fun for him, like going to a Dude Ranch and that he really enjoyed the work.  We said, “Tell all your friends about haying season next year!”  Ha ha.  Anyway, we were extremely grateful for the help and we accomplished a lot while he was here.

IMG_7204
Thanks, Mike!  We hope you come back!

And it wasn’t a complete working vacation for him.  Dave took him through Custer State Park where they got stuck in “buffalo” traffic.  They toured the Needles Highway and went to some brew pubs in Custer.  Most evenings we drank wine and fired some rounds off the back deck.  One evening, while we were eating dinner, a herd of about 30 elk decided they would go to the oat buffet in the southern field.  As the sun set, we enjoyed watching these magnificent creatures and listened to their haunting bugles and elk noises.  It was a great South Dakota experience.

Of course, we saw tons of deer and turkeys enjoying the Holler while Mike was here, too. When you come to the Holler,  you’re going to experience some wild life! Not that we’re that wild, usually we are in bed by 9PM.  Sad.

Yesterday, while checking cows, Sheriff Joe decided to leap out of the Mule and pursue an offending jack rabbit.  The jack was huge and the Sheriff didn’t stand a chance as the rabbit shifted into high gear and ran east, possibly all the way to East River. (That’s South Dakota speak for east of the Missouri)  Upon returning from checking cows, I was working in the garden and nearly stepped on a snake!  Yikes!  Later, Dave and I were putting fence posts in the ground and we heard a strange pounding noise coming from the direction of the house.  The Sheriff and I went up to investigate and discovered a squirrel had fallen into one of our rain barrels.  The little guy was throwing himself against the sides in an attempt to escape.  I distracted the Sheriff by throwing a stick which completely worked.  In his absence, I tipped the barrel over and the squirrel ran out and up the nearest tree.  He then began angrily chatting at me, as if it was my fault he had been stuck. Ungrateful rodent.

In between all the crazy projects, we have put up more pickles.  Three cucumber plants yielded 25 jars of pickles this year, and that doesn’t include the cucumbers we have been eating in salads and giving away to neighbors.  Now the peppers and tomatoes are starting to come in so we also canned some of Dave’s famous corn relish.

The last two days we have also harvested honey from the bees.  There were three medium boxes full of capped honey and we harvested two full ones and left part of the third for the bees to ensure they have enough honey to make it through the winter.

We haven’t figured out how much we will actually get to bottle yet, because it takes awhile for the sticky stuff to run through the filter and get out all the wax and bee parts.  So far, it looks a lot like last year’s honey and the basement smells like flowers!  It is also a giant sticky mess which we will probably tackle today if it keeps raining.

One last thing, I forgot to write about in July.  Dave and I were having coffee one morning and we heard what sounded like a tornado, or giant gust of wind off the west deck.  We quickly discovered that a giant hot air balloon was about to land in our back yard!  We watched the beautiful balloon go down in a field just across the road.  I ran to get the Mule so we could see if they were okay, and Dave yelled to the pilot, “Are you okay?”  He yelled back that everyone was good.  We drove down and discovered they had taken off from Custer and were surprised by 30 knot winds that took them on a wild ride a lot further than they intended to go.

IMG_7289
Never a dull moment on the Holler

Despite the velocity and the distance, the balloon crew arrived in vans almost immediately and picked up the passengers and the pilot.  They packed up the balloon and they were gone, nearly as quickly as they had arrived.  Of course we didn’t let them leave without asking if they wanted to pick up hay bales.  Maybe that’s why they left so quickly.

IMG_9278
Balloon Landing
IMG_7290
The chase crew arrives – notice the square hay bales just begging to be picked up across the road!

Well that is it for August.  It definitely is starting to look and feel like autumn.  September promises to be just as busy for us as we continue the paddock fencing project and we will have to separate and wean calves from their moms. We haven’t even begun to gather firewood for the winter.  It’s all good but it is all going so fast!  Happy Labor Day Weekend, everybody.  We hope summer 2019 was as fun for you as it was for us.

IMG_7129
It stopped raining.  Time to get back to work!

 

Hay for Days…….

11 August 2019 – cloudy and highs in the upper 70s

Hey out there!  We’re still alive, but we have been working outside all summer and that hasn’t left much time for blogging.  I will try to do better but the amount of work we still have to complete before the snow flies is a little overwhelming.  We keep trying to get all of our hay cut and baled and loaded.  It has been hot and rainy (unusual for here) so the hay keeps growing and rain daily means it has been too wet to cut.  When we get two dry days in a row, we mow the hay, and then it rains again so we have to let it dry another day before we rake and bale.

IMG_9633
Dave mowing one of the pastures

We are slowly getting through the haying season, but it just doesn’t want to end.  We still have the north pastures to mow and bale, and our neighbor’s yard.  Then, it looks like we might get a second cut in some of the southern pastures!  Meanwhile, the hay loft is slowly filling up with hay.

IMG_9647
Putting hay in the loft, one pallet (9bales) at a time

To make our lives easier, we stack bales on pallets and let the tractor do the work lifting it into the loft.  We use a pallet jack in the loft to position the pallets of hay.  Over 1000 bales of hay moved so far this summer and possibly another few hundred to go has led Dave and me to believe we need to invest in a round baler. This point was not so subtly emphasized by our UPS driver who said to me, “You’re still picking up those idiot cubes?”  His point was that square bales are a pain, and while in small quantities they are useful, picking them up and stacking them is a lot of work. Anyone out there got a round baler for sale?

IMG_9648
A loft full of “idiot cubes”

In the midst of haying season, I abandoned the ranch and went to the Grand Canyon to pursue a bucket list trip with my brother, Scott.  We hiked the whole canyon, north rim to the south rim in two days.  It was 24 miles of incomparable beauty and stifling hot temperatures.  As one hiker said, “Both God and the Devil live in the canyon.”

It was a great trip and while Scott and I were both worn out at the end, it was an incredible journey and we had a great time.  We ended up sore and tired but thankfully neither of us suffered from any blisters, heat exhaustion or any other injuries.

IMG_9578
View from the South Rim

The canyon was great, but I was ready to get back to the Holler and to my favorite rancher and of course, the Sheriff.  We were back at work the next day picking up hay bales.

IMG_9599
One of many loads of hay
IMG_9627
Sheriff Joe was happy to see me

Summer is coming to a rapid close and we still have a lot to do, including finishing the hay.  We are also trying to get in a new fence around the paddock.  We haven’t even begun to gather firewood.  Meanwhile, the garden is producing lots of goodies, and Dave and I canned 20 jars of pickles this week. Don’t worry, we won’t eat them all but they usually go into goodie baskets for guests and family.

Soon the tomatoes should be ready for canning. Like last year , the peppers didn’t do so good, but I still plan on canning some salsa. The bees are going gangbusters and we should be harvesting Hoten Holler Honey in the next few weeks.

IMG_9646
Bees prepping for their morning sorties

The calves are getting huge and after the hay is up, it won’t be long before they get weaned off of their mothers.  The bull has been in with the cows since mid-July and we are hoping he has been doing his duties.  It appears he is a little worn out, too.

IMG_9621
Koozy, the bull laying down amongst his harem

Tonight, it is raining again which means we won’t be able to do anything with hay until mid day tomorrow at the earliest.  Dave and I are watching the storms roll in and Sheriff Joe is passed out on the floor after a long day of chasing butterflies.  Life is good on the ranch.

IMG_9609
A beautiful August day

 

Lots to Do and Not A Lot of Spring Left to Do It

9 June 2019 – Sunny and forecast to be 65 (but it was 33 this morning!)

It has really greened up on the Holler since my last post.

IMG_8881
Looking at the house from the South Pasture.  The oats are really green and about one beer can high.

The calfies are getting BIG!  Especially the ones that were born in early April.

IMG_8843
The big calves, and in the front with the white face is Moonshine aka Shiner.  He was the one that was so sick and we thought might not make it, but he is a tough guy now!

And here is the newest edition to the herd.  Smudge had a cute little bull and Linda is calling him June Bug.

IMG_E8832
JuneBug and Mama-Smudge giving me a look that says, “Not too close!”

Our calves are spread too far out in age to hold a single roundup, so we elected to drive the first 10 to the vet for branding, castrations and inoculations.  We had already moved the herd to the pasture we call the “Hide Out”  so we had to drive them back to the High Lonesome where we have the ability to separate and load the calves.

IMG_8847
Moms outside the corral and babies inside ready to be loaded up for the vet.

Our herd is pretty gentle and we really didn’t have much trouble doing this.  Rancher Dave and Cowboy Dave took the babies to the vet and Linda and I stayed behind listening to the Mamas pitch a fit for about 3 hours.  They did NOT want to lose track of their babies.

IMG_8850
There goes the trailer full of calves.

The vets did a great job, and the two Daves did the branding.

IMG_8887
Shiner in the calf table
IMG_8886
Rancher Dave giving Andie a brand

They all reunited later that afternoon as Cowboy Dave and Rancher Dave drove the trailer of babies back to the hideout.  The moms heard their babies mooing and ran after the trailer back into that pasture.

Other than moving cows around too many times, we have been busy working on farm equipment and keeping up with the landscaping.  At the last post we had nearly a foot of snow, but here we are the 2nd week of June and we have already mowed the lawn twice in one week!

IMG_8885
Trying to get the mower guides in line so we can get the blade back in it.

The garden is planted (VERY LATE) and we are hoping that there is still season enough left to get some good tomatoes and peppers.  It’s pretty cool still, so the lettuce seems to be doing the best so far.  I’ve also got some flowers going in this cool planter Dave built for me.

IMG_E8826
I love yellow flowers around the red barn.  Cyclone colors!

The bees don’t seem to be thriving like they were at this time last year.  There are plenty of wildflowers for them to visit, but when I opened the hive, there were just not that many bees in there.  I don’t hold high hopes for a lot of honey this year, but the things I don’t know about bees could fill up the Grand Canyon.

And so it goes, the spring is almost gone and we will be cutting oats in the very near future.  Then we will be baling and stacking hay.  By the way, we got the hay loft in the barn completed.

IMG_8884
Hay loft complete.  The idea is to drive the tractor up to it with a pallet of hay for stacking.  We still need a staircase, though!

And before I go, I wanted to write a blog on D-Day, but we were busy and it didn’t get done.  Let me just say how grateful I am to be an American and for my freedom.  Thank you to all the veterans, and especially to those brave men that stormed Normandy 75 years ago.  The only thing we can say is Thank You.

flag of u s a standing near tomb

 

It Ain’t Over Yet

22 May 2019 – SNOWING AND 32 DEGREES

Hey out there!  It’s Throw-back Tuesday.  Here’s a picture of winter on the Holler.

IMG_8766
May 22 2019

Oh wait, that picture is from today.  That’s right.  We are in the middle of a late spring blizzard.  We already have eight inches of snow on the ground and are forecast to get at least eight more tonight.  Winter just won’t quit. We did have a little taste of spring last week with a few days in the upper 70s and low 80s.  Stupidly, I washed and put away all of our winter gear.  Mother Nature must have taken this as a taunt and now I’m paying for it.

IMG_E8764
At least the Sheriff is happy about the snow

But that is just how it goes.  Mountain weather in the springtime.  Meanwhile, the cows are still requiring hay because they can’t forage through all this white stuff.  The woodshed is definitely a lot more empty than we expected it to be by now.  Also, I am praying the one remaining beehive survives this bout of cold and moisture.  The moisture should be very good for all the oats we planted, though.

Since I last wrote, two more calves have been born.  Puzzle had her baby, a bull named Riddle. And of course, in the middle of the snow storm yesterday Freida decided to calf.  She also had a bull named Freddy Prinze.  Unfortunately I haven’t been able to get a good picture of either of them yet because the Moms have been hiding out from the snow storm.

One warm day last week I went for a hike down Sunday Gulch near Sylvan Lake.  I had read on a trail review that it was rated “difficult” and I assumed that meant it was really steep.  I was up for the challenge but now realize now that “difficult” means very rocky with lots of streams to cross and boulders to climb.

 

Add a lot of melting snow and running water to these obstacles and it made for a really adventurous hike. The trail is a big loop with the two trailheads beginning at the lake.  I hiked it in a clockwise direction and I didn’t see a soul until I neared the end back at the lake.  When I got to the trail end which would have been the counter-clockwise trailhead, I had to climb under a barrier that said, “TRAIL CLOSED”.  That’s me, the accidental rebel.

Today, Rancher Dave, Sheriff Joe and I are holed up in the house watching the snow.  We’ll venture out a few times to check on cows and to fill up the wood tote so we can keep the stove going.  Fortunately, the days are getting really long so our solar power is doing great.  We had to scrape snow off of the panels this morning, but it is not cold enough for the snow to stick to them now so we aren’t worried about power.

IMG_8765
Clearing the panels
IMG_8771
The woodshed is far more empty than we expected

Coming up, we are looking forward to some warmer weather and a chance to get back to work.  We have to do some mower repairs, some corral repairs to get ready for round-up, and before you know it we will be cutting and baling hay. I’m just hoping we don’t have to shovel snow off of it first!

IMG_8793
….And two days after the snow!

 

Sun and Water

21 March 2019 – Sunny and highs in the upper 50’s…  WOO HOO!

Everyone on the Holler is in a good mood.  The sun is shining, the snow is melting, and there is water everywhere.  We have water in the stock dam which would be really great if it held all year.  We have a river running through our front yard and another in the northern pasture.

IMG_6330
So much water in the stock dam. If only it would last all summer!
IMG_8263
A river running through the northern pasture.
IMG_6321
Sheriff Joe hunting in the snow next to the stock dam.

 

The cows are fat and happy.  They have been soaking in the sunshine in the afternoon and laying in the fields.

IMG_6326
Fat and Happy Cows relaxing in the warmer weather.
IMG_8278
Patsy off laying by herself….is she getting ready to calve or just annoyed with all the other ladies?

The bees are buzzing.  Despite my doom and gloom attitude of once again believing they did not survive the winter, both hives have been exhibiting a lot of activity since the temperatures have warmed up.  I was worried several weeks ago when there was so much snow on the ground and the temperatures had been so low.  When it finally warmed a bit, I went to check the exterior of the hives and it looked like someone had vacuumed all the bees out, killed them and dumped them in the snow.

I am assuming they had just been hiding so long from the cold that they had to take advantage of the warm day and dump out all the dead.  I really hope that we have some good foraging for them this summer. In about 6 weeks I will begin planting things, including some plants especially for them.

None of the cows have had their calves yet, and we are truly grateful that no one decided to give birth during the bomb cyclone that went just south of us.  We really just had a lot of wind and a little snow, but the wet and windy conditions aren’t good for new babies.

The Stagecoach Springs gang has a pool going on which cow will be the first to calve.  The ante is a six pack of beer.  I bet on Rosie today….so if she doesn’t calve today then I’m out a six pack. Linda and Rancher Dave picked Marzee on the 23rd and 27th respectively.  Cowboy has his beer on Rosie but not until the 27th.  Rosie did look pretty fat and happy this morning but does not appear to be bagging up yet so it is not looking good for my beer bet. I still may have a shot at the bonus beer which is a bet on the sex of the calves.

The barn is nearly out of hay.  Maverick is quite ticked that his furniture is all gone, but I think he is enjoying the warmer weather as well.

The only one that isn’t happy about the melting snow is the Sheriff.  He will go out and find the only patch of snow left and roll all over it.  Then he will lay there and refuse to move.  He loves winter!  I think he is considering moving to Alaska for the summer.

IMG_8289 (2)
Sheriff Joe finds one of the remaining spots of snow to cool himself.

That’s about it for March so far.  We hope everyone out there is enjoying spring as much as we are!

 

 

Hey! What About Autumn?

28 September 2018 – Snow (wait, what?) Snow and 31 degrees

Last week it was hot.  This week it is not.

IMG_7228
September Snow

It seems we went directly from summer to winter. But next week is forecast to be much more typical fall temperatures, highs in the 50s and lows in the 30s.  That’s about perfect weather, but Mother Nature’s little swipe at us last night didn’t sit too well with most of the critters on the Holler.  The cows came out of the woods this morning and were extremely loud and rude, crabbily mooing at the house until Rancher Dave went out and fed them some bales.

IMG_7237
Rancher Dave putting bales in the feeder

The bees are probably in shock.  Fortunately, I did get all the honey supers off the hive and the mite treatments out, so they should be all set for winter. Goose is warm in the barn and Maverick is over at the High Lonesome, where he spends about every other night.  That little punk digs his way out of the barn at night and sometimes hunts over there or steals the cat food Linda puts out for her barn kitties.

The Sheriff, for one, is very excited about the snow.  He hasn’t seen snow yet in his life and he went out first thing this morning and growled and barked at his surroundings.  Shortly after discovering that the white stuff wouldn’t kill him, he tried to eat as much of it as he could.  Then he went bananas.  He started sprinting around in circles, rolling and jumping in the snow.  He acted like a little kid that heard he got a snow day off from school.

IMG_5524
Blurry picture of a crazy dog

In other news, the Hoten Holler ranch made its first cattle sales last week. Cowboy Dave and Rancher Dave loaded up the spring calves and took them to the cattle auction in St. Onge, South Dakota.

 

 

We had two steers for sale, T-BONE and Dude.  Cowboy and Linda had 2 heifers, Lilly and Heidi, and one steer, Chips.  They kept Hugo, Patsy’s calf, as a bull and plan to replace Koozy with him in a couple of years.

 

Both Dave and I thought it would be hard to sell these calves since we have known them since their births.  We told ourselves that these steers have had it made out here all spring and summer on the Holler.  They have been so spoiled to live in these beautiful hills with no shortage of food or water and plenty of supplemental treats from the garden and cake and creep.  They have been handled gently and well cared for, but it was time for them to go.  We also reminded ourselves that if we were made of hay or grass, they would have no problem eating us!

IMG_5506
Rancher Dave and Cowboy Dave smoke a celebratory cigar in honor of the calve sales

The sale of the calves was bitter-sweet, but now we can move forward to the next cycle of life in the cattle business.  We are hoping that we have 14 bred cows this fall that should calve in late April or early May. In between now and then, we will take the best care we can of the cows (and the two bulls) and make sure they are spoiled, fat, and happy.

Speaking of spoiled, fat, and happy, I have a pot of chili cooking on the wood stove for supper. It’s warm and cozy in the house and it feels like a perfect winter day…..except it’s September!!!

IMG_7243
Chili on the stove and Sheriff Joe warms himself after a morning of crazy running through the snow.

 

The Lazy Days of Summer

25 August 2018 – Sunny and 86 degrees

The weekly blog post has fallen completely off of my weekly to-do list.  Probably because Dave and I have just been sitting around eating bon-bons, watching our stories on the TV, and drinking wine while the sun sets.  Ha ha, I wish!  We FINALLY got done haying the second week of August (just over a 1,000 bales for us) and over 300 bales for the neighbor, Sheri.

We separated calves from mama cows and sent the bull and the older ladies up to a northern pasture. The calves are penned up over at the High Lonesome, where Cowboy and Linda have the facilities and fence to keep them from their moms.  The first week, the babies bawled and bawled so much that the mamas broke out the northern pasture three times and came back to find their kids.  So we rounded them up and sent them north again and again.  Finally, they decided they weren’t going to get to see their babies anymore and stayed put.  The calves decided they like living the high-life at the High Lonesome, since Pilot Dave feeds them a bucket of creep twice a day and makes sure they have hay and water.

IMG_6967
The mamas and the bull up in the north pasture’s pond
IMG_6972
The calvies having creep for breakfast

I am pretty sure I wrote this last year, but creep is a supplement to help wean the calves from milk and onto grass.  It basically looks like grain and they love it. So we will keep them on creep for another week or so and then they should be good with grass.  These calves are all going to auction in October, so rather than reunite them with the herd, we plan to just keep them separate and make our lives easier when it is time for them to go.  I don’t want to think about it.

Other than calve creeping and watering, we have been working on putting a fence around the barn.  Once that is complete, the herd (minus calves) can come over to the Holler and graze our pastures. We thought that building a fence around the barn would be about a ten day project, and I’m sure you can guess why it has taken us over 2 weeks…..that’s right, ROCKS.IMG_6995

In typical South Dakota style, some fence posts went right in the ground, and others required Pilot Dave and I to pound, chisel, dig, and even rent a jack-hammer.  When Dave went in to get the jack-hammer, the guy at the hardware store said, “Last time, you told me not ever to rent this to you again!”  After a day of pounding away, we remembered why.

Dave and I were discussing how we feel like we are tired all the time, but we both feel stronger than when we first moved out here.  In 2016, I could barely hold the jackhammer up, but this summer, I actually got in there and worked on quite a few holes.  He said it didn’t seem as tough as the first time for him either.  Ranching makes you thick! (Or thick-headed!)

So after getting the corner posts in and lined up, we went to work lining up T-posts, then stringing wire, stretching wire, tying off wire, and clipping wire to the posts.  We are done with that part this afternoon and enjoying a cold Keystone for our work.  The only thing left is to hang the gates, and we will do that after a quick trip to Rapid to buy them on Tuesday.

IMG_7021
Northwestern corner of the barnyard
IMG_7018
Southwestern corner with the barn in the back

We decided with all the hay in the barn and the impending fall weather, it was time to get some barn cats to keep the mice out of the hay.  This morning, Linda and I went to the humane society and picked out two potential mousers.

IMG_7027
The (Grey) Goose

Goose is really sweet, social, and friendly.  She does have a feisty side and will bat at you if you come at her a little too quickly.  We hope this means she will hunt.  Maverick is really stand-offish and shy. That’s why I haven’t got a picture of him yet. We let him in the barn and in half a second he disappeared into the hay bales and we haven’t seen him since.  I’m hoping he will warm up to us, or not.  As long as he can find his food, water, and get some mice it is all good!  The plan is to keep them in the barn for 4-5 days while they figure out it is safe, they have beds to sleep in, food and water, and a target rich environment.  Then they will be outdoor/barn kitties.  Happy hunting!

And finally, sometime over a week ago, I harvested honey from the bees.  Both hives are going strong and I saw evidence of queens in each.  I left the new colony all the honey they have made (which I’m estimating is around 70lbs) since they will need it this winter.  I harvested a little over 2 gallons from the original hive as the two deep supers I think have about 70-80 lbs of honey for them this winter.

IMG_6994
Filtered honey dripping into jars
IMG_6993
The bright yellow stuff going into the filter

This harvest, the honey was more yellow, not as perfumey, and just a little sweeter than last.  I think they got more nectar from wild flowers as the sweet clover is almost all gone. Either way, those magnificent little bees just keep working away!  I will open the hive only two more times before winter; once to put in a mite treatment, and another to take the mite treatment out.  Then the hives get wrapped in tar-paper and we will wish them luck.

Oh and one more thing.  Remember the giant piles of rocks left from the barn excavation?IMG_5328

Dave put an ad on Craig’s List and wrote, “Free rocks!”  and about 10 days later, a gentleman called and said he was putting in a driveway and needed the rocks for a base.  We said, “Come and get ‘em!”  And he came for 11 loads of rocks, using his own Bobcat and dump trailer to load and haul them away.  Hooray for Craig’s List!

That’s the August wrap-up.  We hope everyone is doing good out there in the real world! And P.S. at the time of this post I have seen Maverick the Cat.  I went up to the barn and hung out drinking my morning coffee and the little guy got brave enough to come out and say Hi.  Then Goose smacked him around a bit and he ran back into the hay bales.  Cat Drama!

IMG_7024
Sheriff Joe takes a nap after a hard afternoon of fencing.

 

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

Humble Little Homestead

Living Simply and Enjoying the Good Life

Feed Yard Foodie

A foodie running a cattle feedyard in Nebraska

Small-Scale Cattle Farming

Resource for people keeping small herds of cattle of any and all breeds.

Crippled Cowgirl

Growing up on a Montana Cattle Ranch and the struggle after being diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis

J.C. Brae

Country Music Artist

Homestead Diaries

Finding joy in red dirt, rusted hinges, and wide open spaces

On the loose

Living life in pursuit of ten feet tall, still!

Meanwhile, back at the ranch...

music, poetry, musings, photography and philosophy from a woman who found her way back home and wants you to come over for a hike and a cocktail.

Jolyn Young

Writing (and laughing) through life

The Pioneer Woman

Plowing through Life in the Country...One Calf Nut at a Time

Life on a Colorado Farm

Life on a Colorado Farm (All Rights Reserved)

Cowboy Wife

Tidbits from life on the range

My Last Best Place

The pleasures & perils of horsemanship, marriage, and owning a small farm

%d bloggers like this: