12 July 2020 – Sunny and 84 – Perfect

Last time I was crabbing about no rain.  That very evening, Dave and I were sitting on the back porch laughing as all the storm clouds built up and went right around us, as has been the pattern for the summer.  There really was nothing left to do but laugh, and Mother Nature must have felt we were mocking her.  Suddenly a giant cloud began building to the Southwest, and it was moving pretty quickly and we were its bullseye.  As the storm came nearer, the wind picked up and Dave said, “That cloud is green.”  All my midwestern people recognize this is never a good sign.

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Storm lining up on the Holler

We hustled around putting up lawn chairs and closing up the greenhouse in anticipation of a big storm and I’m glad we did.  The wind in front of the cloud was insane, it was blowing so hard all the trees were leaning over.  Then the hail began.  The stones were not big, but they were being propelled by the wind and pummeling the house.  There was so much hail coming down so fast it looked like the roof was vomiting. We still had piles of hail on our porch the next morning.  It was loud too, as we have a tin roof.  Dave positioned himself at the front door and watched helplessly as he thought the greenhouse would blow away.  I stayed looking out the back at the poor garden and the poor cows, who headed for the hills and disappeared behind the dark sheets of rain and hail.

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Hail piled up on the deck

Dave said he saw the cat sprint out of the barn and run and hide under the porch.  I cannot imagine how loud the wind and hail was in the barn, but it must have been enough that poor Maverick thought he had better run for his life.  After about 20 minutes the hail let up and it was just pouring rain so I thought I would stick my head out and see if I could find the cat.  As it rained the porch area began to flood and I could hear Maverick howling his head off as he was stuck in the rising waters under the porch.  I ran outside in my flip flops and tried to fish him out but he would not come.  I was standing in about 5 inches of water and I thought I would try to get him out the other side of the porch but as I changed positions Dave yelled out the door, “There he goes!”  And I caught sight of him running toward the woodshed.  I sloshed over there in ankle high water and was able to catch him, wrap him in a towel and run through the pouring rain back inside the house.  He was really making a lot of noise meowing and complaining, but he didn’t try to escape my grasp. When we got inside, he looked so pathetic, all soaking wet. I’m sure I also looked pathetic, all soaking wet!  I put him in the mudroom and toweled him off and now he is my new best friend.

The rain didn’t let up until after dark, and the next morning Dave and I went outside to survey the damage.  Fortunately none of our buildings were damaged and I feel like we really dodged that bullet because that was one wicked storm!  There were casualties, however, especially the garden.  The cucumbers were decimated, the corn looked like someone had taken a weed-whacker to it, and the tomato plants were all laying on their sides. The potato plants which were previously as tall as my chin, were also flattened.  We walked north to the field where we had hoped to salvage some of our remaining barley and it also was flattened and laying down.

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Flattened Cucumbers
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Smashed Potatoes

I guess this isn’t the year to grow things on the Holler.  But at least we got some much needed rain and hopefully it will promote some growth in the grazing fields. By some miracle the greenhouse stayed standing with no damage.

The Sheriff was quite happy with the storm.  I really do count my blessings with this dog.  He is a cool customer and the thunder and hail does not bother him one bit.  He also is great about riding in the truck and doesn’t whine or drool but he just sticks his head out the window watching the world go by.  He is a very easy going dog.  One thing he liked about the rain storm was that it filled up his stock dam with water.

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Stock Dam Full of Water

He has been going swimming every day since and he loves it.  If I don’t take him out there, he sneaks off and comes back soaking wet.  This is always followed by a victory roll in the dirt which makes him a mud-puppy indeed!

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The Sheriff’s new swimming hole

After the storm, the drama on the Holler did not let up.  Yesterday morning at around 5AM we heard the bull making a lot of noise.  Dave jumped out of bed and saw our neighbor’s cows hanging out by the gate next to our herd.  Our neighbor has downsized her herd (2 cows and 1 calf) so we agreed to let her cows in with the bull so she can get them bred.  Dave saw them down by the gate and said he was going to run down there and let them in.  I said sleepily from under the covers, “Do you need help?”  and he said no and that I should go back to sleep. Oh, my sweet husband.

I heard him drive down in the Mule and I could not go back to sleep, feeling guilty that I should have gone with him.  It is always hard to move cows through a gate with just one person. I got up and threw on my jeans and watched him from the back window.  He was doing great, using cake to move the neighbor’s cows through the first gate despite our cows crowding him wanting cake.  Then he called me on the radio and said, “I think Harley prolapsed.”  Harley is our neighbor’s favorite pet cow and it appeared she had a vaginal prolapse which can occur in a pregnant cow before calving.

GRAPHIC IMAGE BELOW WARNING:

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Oh Poor Harley!  Yikes!!

Dave decided it would not be a good situation to let her cows in with our herd because there is always fighting when new cows arrive, and poor Harley clearly needed some medical attention.  He moved the neighbor’s cows to a smaller pasture so we could have easier access to Harley and he came back to the house.

We called the neighbor but only got voicemail.  We called the vet to see if this was an urgent life-threatening situation, but again it was around 5:30 AM so we got their emergency pager number instead of a person.  We discussed our options and decided that if it were our cow we would catch her and load her up immediately and take her to the vet.  So we began loading up cattle panels on the tractor and we hooked up our trailer to the truck.  During this time, the neighbor called and said she was on her way and agreed we should take Harley in to the vet.  The vet also called while we were managing the cow-moving logistics and said they would make room in their schedule for whenever we could get there.

So we drove the tractor with the panels and the truck with the trailer to the pasture where Dave had secluded Harley and company.  Harley was clearly hurting and did not want anything to do with us, but we were able to set up the panels in the corner and push her into the trailer.  Dave and the neighbor went off to the vet and I cleaned up what I could by myself with them gone.

The vets took care of Harley, cleaning her parts and pushing her prolapse back inside of her.  Then they laced her up to keep her insides on the inside of her. The repositioning apparently is not an easy task as the vets would push and the cow would try to push against them so she kept prolapsing, but the vets eventually won and were able to lace her up tight.  They said she did not have an unborn calf, which led us all to believe that she may have had a calf out in a field somewhere or she had aborted, causing her to prolapse.  The strange thing is she was not exposed to a bull in the timeframe that would have her calving now, but we have seen this movie before where a cow calved and we could not explain who the daddy might be.  We also know there are roving bulls out here so maybe that is what happened.

Regardless, the neighbor’s property is many, many acres of hills, forests and valleys and if Harley calved out there it would be nearly impossible to find the baby.  Dave and the neighbor took Harley back to her corral after deciding it was too dangerous for her to be in with a new herd and especially a bull.  Harley was not happy about being alone and the neighbor let her out on her large acreage in the hopes that if there was a calf the Momma would find it and possibly save it.  This morning, Harley showed up at our gate again without a calf so we’re fairly certain if she did calve it did not survive.

While Dave and the neighbor were at the vet, I saw the neighbor’s remaining cow and calf hanging out by the gate and I pushed them into our pasture so the cow could be exposed to the bull.  Of course, there was a lot of fighting initially as every one of our cows had to explain to the poor new girl that they were higher than her in the pecking order.  The new girl, who the neighbor calls Wooly Bear, did not back down from a fight so there was a lot of snorting and grunting and kicking up dust well into the afternoon. If you’ve ever seen a movie with scenes from the prison yard, you can imagine what it is like when a new cow goes in with an existing herd. Cow Drama.

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Wooly Bear and her calf, Frosty

Today, things have settled significantly. The herd all seems to be getting along but I feel so bad for Harley stuck on the other side of the fence.  Her old companion, Wooly Bear slept next to her by the fence last night.  I know people think animals do not have feelings, but I truly believe they have a routine and they do not like change. But, like people, they will adjust although sometimes against their will.

If that isn’t enough excitement for you, I have one more little story.  This morning I was doing the usual chores and was getting ready to walk down to what remains of the garden to water plants.  I started walking down the hill in our yard, about ten feet from our porch and I heard the strangest noise behind me.  It sounded like an automatic sprinkler coming on, just a very quick hissing sound.  Joey was behind me so I thought maybe he had some toy or made some weird noise and I turned around and realized I was standing about 6 feet from a fat coiled up prairie rattlesnake.  Joey was on the opposite side of the snake and I very calmly commanded him to move away and get on the porch.  Dave was in the house so I very calmly yelled, “Oh Dave, could you please come out here for a second?”

Okay, that’s not what happened at all….I completely freaked out.  I HATE snakes and I literally almost stepped on this venomous critter.  My dog was on the opposite side of it and I started screaming bloody murder.  “Joey!  Get Away!  Leave it leave it leave it! AHHHHH!!!!”  It must have really startled Dave because he came running out of the house and said, “What’s wrong?”  All I could say/scream was “SNAKE SNAKE SNAKE!!!”

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Prairie Rattler minus its head

If it hasn’t been revealed in all the blogs up to this point, I would like to say that Dave is a much cooler customer than I will ever be.  He jumped off the porch, grabbed Joey’s collar and hauled him inside.  Then he returned with his .410 shotgun and blew the snake’s head off.  My hero.

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Dead Eye Dave, One Shot, One Kill

I know that snakes are good for the environment, but there is no way I can feel bad about killing a poisonous snake that is that close to my front door so save it if you’re mad about the snake slaughter.  It’s dead and if another rattler shows up here it is getting the same treatment. Sorry, not sorry.

So that’s it for the last few exciting days. We did get a nice rainstorm again early Thursday morning so hopefully this pattern will continue without the hail and wind. And we are definitely grateful for the rain although it is probably what is driving the snakes out of their holes.  We hope everyone is doing well out there in the real world and keeping yourselves safe and free! Happy Monday!

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The Holler Herd